Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I installed Lubuntu 11.10 and it run without problems. I decided to install Ubuntu 11.10 mini instead of Lubuntu 11.10.

After the installation the operating system didn't boot. I only saw the black screen. I used sysresccd and tried to repair grub according to this guide and I tried solution 2. It didn't help.

I tried to repair it with lilo. I remembered that at some time in the past I repaired mbr with lilo and everything was OK. After using the command:

lilo -M /dev/sda mbr

I restarted the laptop and a message appeared (I don't remember what it said). I understood that I had to install grub again and repeated the procedure with sysresccd, which didn't help.

EDIT: fdisk -l /dev/sda

EDIT: content of /boot directory of sda1 partition

EDIT: I used google and found this link. It seems that this is my problem. It was only sufficient to press ctrl+alt+F1 and Ubuntu started booting. After commenting the line containing vt.handoff in /etc/grub.d/10_linux everything was OK. How to close this question?

share|improve this question
    
It will be much easier for someone to help you if you reboot the machine again and take note of the error message. –  Teresa e Junior Feb 6 '12 at 17:18
    
the error message was something like "no operating system found". You won't get more information from it. I understood it that lilo cleared mbr, so I reinstalled grub. –  xralf Feb 6 '12 at 17:35
    
Please boot from rescue-cd and post the output of fdisk -l /dev/sda. –  Nils Feb 9 '12 at 21:18
    
@Nils See question edit –  xralf Feb 10 '12 at 9:26
    
Can you post your /etc/fstab ? –  Neel Basu Feb 10 '12 at 11:01
show 7 more comments

4 Answers 4

Boot from a Live CD. Go to root prompt.

#grub
grub> root (hd0,0) //for first hard disk, first partition
grub> find /boot/grub/stage1
grub> setup (hd0)
grub> quit

You should start working again. you can then change the menu.lst

If your /boot is located on some other disk or some other partition you should change (hdN,n) accordingly

share|improve this answer
    
the command find /boot/grub/stage1 prints Error 15: File not found –  xralf Feb 10 '12 at 9:20
    
I appended to question the content of /boot directory. –  xralf Feb 10 '12 at 9:44
    
find /boot/grub/stage1 will fail if /boot is on its own partition (as it many times is, to overcome buggy BIOS limitations (ever heard of INT13h?)), maybe unless a symbolic link exists (boot/ -> /), depending on how grub is able to handle those. In this case, you can use find, just replace it by find /grub/acpi.mod (a file that your list shows). From your file tree, it's possible to see that grub was never completely installed at the right place (/grub) and is scattered across /boot. –  njsg Feb 10 '12 at 10:24
    
I can try find /grub/acpi.mod. And how does it repair the booting? When I want to do something I have to change the hard drive in the laptop so I'm glad to do some "bigger" operations. –  xralf Feb 10 '12 at 13:48
    
That is for grub-legacy. Ubuntu has been using grub2 since 9.10. –  psusi Feb 10 '12 at 14:51
show 2 more comments

If you are getting "no operating system found" it is because you still have the LILO MBR installed, and have not reinstalled grub. To reinstall grub, boot from the live cd, and mount the Ubuntu partition:

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

Then reinstall grub2:

sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you encountered an old problem here.

Try to create a small partition within the first 1000 cylinders (8 cyl. should be enough) and install grub there. Don`t forget to mark that partition as bootable and remove the bootable flag from the current sda1 partition.

The partition numbering might change on the way, so it is possible you have to replace sda1 with sda2 in /etc/fstab and the root= parameter of your kernel, too.

share|improve this answer
1  
Can you explain what problem you are talking about? Aligning partitions to cylinders is not reccommended, not only parted will hate you for doing so. –  Baarn Feb 11 '12 at 1:09
    
The old problem might be that grub has to be within the first 1023 cylinders (with "older" BIOSes). I did not say anything about aligning. –  Nils Feb 11 '12 at 22:16
    
BIOSes with this limitation pretty much went away around the turn of the century. If this were the problem, you would get a grub error and rescue prompt, not "no operating system found". –  psusi Feb 14 '12 at 14:39
add comment

From your /boot tree, it appears that somehow your grub's actual boot files got put into /boot/boot/grub. Try cp -i /boot/boot/grub/* /boot/grub.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.