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I'm having trouble using any relatively new binary distro on this machine. The last binary distro to work without issue was Ubuntu 8.04. I'm currently using Gentoo with the latest 3.2.1 kernel and its working fine with all peripherals functional. I was using Gentoo before (since I've always had this problem) but I decided I was tired of configuring everything myself and waiting for things to compile all the time.

I tried installing Linux Mint 12, Fedora 16 and Debian Squeeze all with the same results, the kernel panics. It seems to happen more frequently when waking the notebook up or when the wireless card is connected to a network.

I've read various articles indicating that there are issues with the wireless card I have, but I would think that using rmmod iwl4965 and rmmod iwl_legacy as well as shutting off the wireless radio would ensure that the wireless card could not cause a kernel panic. This didn't fix the problem. I have also tried using both proprietary nvidia drivers and the open-source nouveau drivers after reading that some people had issues with the video card.

I also find it hard to believe that it's a hardware problem since all of my hardware works when everything is compiled on the system with Gentoo. I have proprietary video drivers working, the machine sleeps and wakes without issue, and I have no issues using wpa_supplicant and wicd on my wireless card.

Does anyone have any thoughts?

Background information:

  • Notebook computer: Lenovo T61

Output of lspci:

00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Mobile PM965/GM965/GL960 Memory Controller Hub (rev 0c)
00:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Mobile PM965/GM965/GL960 PCI Express Root Port (rev 0c)
00:19.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82566MM Gigabit Network Connection (rev 03)
00:1a.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI  Controller #4 (rev 03)
00:1a.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #5 (rev 03)
00:1a.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #2 (rev 03)
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) HD Audio Controller (rev 03)
00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 1 (rev 03)
00:1c.1 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 2 (rev 03)
00:1c.2 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 3 (rev 03)
00:1c.3 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 4 (rev 03)
00:1c.4 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) PCI Express Port 5 (rev 03)
00:1d.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #1 (rev 03)
00:1d.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #2 (rev 03)
00:1d.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB UHCI Controller #3 (rev 03)
00:1d.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #1 (rev 03)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 Mobile PCI Bridge (rev f3)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801HBM (ICH8M-E) LPC Interface  Controller (rev 03)
00:1f.2 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82801HBM/HEM (ICH8M/ICH8M-E) SATA IDE Controller (rev 03)
00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) SMBus Controller (rev 03)
01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation Quadro NVS 140M (rev a1)
03:00.0 Network controller: Intel Corporation PRO/Wireless 4965 AG or AGN [Kedron] Network Connection (rev 61)
15:00.0 CardBus bridge: Ricoh Co Ltd RL5c476 II (rev ba)
15:00.1 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Ricoh Co Ltd R5C832 IEEE 1394 Controller (rev  04)
15:00.2 SD Host controller: Ricoh Co Ltd R5C822 SD/SDIO/MMC/MS/MSPro Host Adapter (rev 21)
15:00.3 System peripheral: Ricoh Co Ltd R5C843 MMC Host Controller (rev 11)
15:00.4 System peripheral: Ricoh Co Ltd R5C592 Memory Stick Bus Host Adapter (rev 11)
15:00.5 System peripheral: Ricoh Co Ltd xD-Picture Card Controller (rev 11)

/proc/cpuinfo

processor       : 0
vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
cpu family      : 6
model           : 15
model name      : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU     T7300  @ 2.00GHz
stepping        : 10
microcode       : 0x92
cpu MHz         : 2000.000
cache size      : 4096 KB
physical id     : 0
siblings        : 2
core id         : 0
cpu cores       : 2
apicid          : 0
initial apicid  : 0
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 10
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe syscall nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts rep_good nopl aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm lahf_lm ida dts tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority
bogomips        : 3989.02
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor       : 1
vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
cpu family      : 6
model           : 15
model name      : Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU     T7300  @ 2.00GHz
stepping        : 10
microcode       : 0x92
cpu MHz         : 1200.000
cache size      : 4096 KB
physical id     : 0
siblings        : 2
core id         : 1
cpu cores       : 2
apicid          : 1
initial apicid  : 1
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 10
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe syscall nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts rep_good nopl aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm lahf_lm ida dts tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority
bogomips        : 3989.80
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 36 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

ACPI related Kernel Flags

CONFIG_X86_64_ACPI_NUMA=y
CONFIG_ACPI=y
CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP=y
CONFIG_ACPI_PROCFS=y
CONFIG_ACPI_PROC_EVENT=y
CONFIG_ACPI_AC=y
CONFIG_ACPI_BATTERY=y
CONFIG_ACPI_BUTTON=y
CONFIG_ACPI_FAN=y
CONFIG_ACPI_DOCK=y
CONFIG_ACPI_PROCESSOR=y
CONFIG_ACPI_HOTPLUG_CPU=y
CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL=y
CONFIG_ACPI_NUMA=y
CONFIG_ACPI_BLACKLIST_YEAR=0
CONFIG_ACPI_CONTAINER=y
CONFIG_X86_ACPI_CPUFREQ=y
CONFIG_PNPACPI=y
CONFIG_ATA_ACPI=y
share|improve this question
    
when does the kp occur? immediately on startup? randomly? during shutdown? –  bdowning Feb 2 '12 at 16:47
    
It occurs at unpredictable intervals (unpredictable to me anyway). It seems to happen more frequently when waking the computer or using wireless networking. In fact, it is almost impossible to complete an installation of any binary distribution with the wireless adapter connected to a wireless network. I have to switch the radio to 'off' in order to finish an installation of Fedora, Debian or Mint. Just to be clear, the panics are less frequent when not connected to wireless (or at least it seems this way) but unloading the modules and turning the wireless off does not prevent panics. –  Sean C. Feb 2 '12 at 19:40
    
I've received MCE error codes as well, but they're never the same when the panic occurs. I don't have the codes on hand, but I've seen at least 10 different codes. I've pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I'm stuck using Gentoo to get a stable machine... and stable it is -- been running for days now without a panic. –  Sean C. Feb 2 '12 at 19:45
2  
Can you provide examples of some of the panics? I recognize this might not be a simple request since it sounds like you cant do kernel remote logging :-(. Also, have you tried building your own kernel on those other distros? Unless youre using the gentoo-sources package for your kernel, theres no difference. –  Patrick Jul 2 '12 at 11:51
    
Hi Patrick. This was a pretty old question so I was surprised when I got the message about a comment. Your solution was, and is the current solution I'm using; kind of anyway. I just copied my Gentoo kernel over to Linux Mint and booted off that kernel. There was a little tinkering involved, but it works fine now. Thanks for the comment though. –  Sean C. Jul 5 '12 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

Most of the kernel panics I used to had with old hardware turned out to be due to faulty RAM modules. You should try running a memory test on the machine. Possibly the relatively new distributions have much larger kernels and access your memory with patterns that stresses your memory and cause it to fail.

It is also important to note that memory test software like memtest86 has lots of testing schemes. Each of them test a different aspect of your memory response that may occur in real-life operation, so you should allow all of the tests to complete and maybe wait for two or three full cycles to make sure your RAM are working correctly.

share|improve this answer

Just a thought: This is propably due to the power-saving functions. I had problems activating power-save features on an ASUS-SP3G with Intel DX4-100 processor if I used anything newer than Debian 3.

Perhaps the standards have changed again but this time you got hit by it?

share|improve this answer
    
I know I'm using ACPI in my Gentoo Kernel, are these power-saving functions you're referring to the processor P-states? I'm pretty sure I have support built-into my kernel for that. So, shouldn't my Gentoo be experiencing the same kernel panics as the other distro? –  Sean C. Feb 2 '12 at 13:55
    
In the above example it was APM. It was disabled in later distributions because my BIOS had a "known bug" (and I could not force it on). In early distributions this was handled differently and everything worked (especially power-off when halting). I have no idea what the exact problem might be in your case - this is just a direction I wanted to hint about. –  Nils Feb 2 '12 at 20:36

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