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Is there any graphical file-manager which supports thumbnails for linux like thunar or nautilus, which allows me to filter a directory by a regular expression. For example typing /home/user/*tex should show all tex-files, or [AB].* all files starting with A or B etc.

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Just for the record, /home/user/*tex is not a regular expression which matches all tex files—you have likely confused shell globbing with regexps. Your example matches /home/usertex, /home/user/tex, /home/user//tex, etc. If you want to match all tex files in this manner, the regex would be something like /home/user/.*tex (note that this would match tex files in a subdirectory as well). –  HalosGhost Jul 8 at 21:00

3 Answers 3

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The midnight-commander, which is a kind of hybrid between graphical and text based, supports globbing, which is, what you show in your examples.

Therefor, filemanagers which claim to be graphical versions of midnight-commander (Krusador?) should be able to do it.

A difference between globbing and regex is, for example

 foo*bar in regex means foobar, fooobar, foooooooobar etc.
 foo*bar in globbing means foo.bar fooxbar, all of the above. 

[AB] means the same, but a dot is a wildcard here, and a dot there.

 ca[nt].png  matches cat.png and can.png in both cases, 
 but catopng only as regex. 

A single wildcard character in globbing is ?: ca? is for example cat, can, car and so on.

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You'll find on Wikipedia a complete list of file managers, with a detailed comparison of what search/regexp features they offers. You'll have to cross-results with *nix-compatible ones, though.

It seems that at least Konqueror and Dolphin support regexp and thumbnails.

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Pcmanfm allow you to filter the view. Try to press ctrl + e then if you write *.tex you see only tex file like when you use the ls command.

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That is not a regular expression. That is simply an example of shell globbing. –  HalosGhost Jul 8 at 20:54

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