Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Because of a noisy fan in my laptop, I need to change CPU frequency and for this task I need to load the appropriate kernel module.

The CPU in my laptop Acer TravelMate 4002WLMi is:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep "model name"
model name  : Intel(R) Pentium(R) M processor 1.60GHz

This article helped me to find the kernel module I need (my CPU differs only a little in frequency).

After the sudo modprobe speedstep_centrino command nothing happened. echo $? returns 0.

Here is the output of lsmod and dmesg and other useful outputs.

Could you help me solve this problem (explain what's wrong with kernel modules and use the appropriate module for changing CPU frequency)?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Braiam, jasonwryan, slm Oct 28 at 1:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions describing a problem that can't be reproduced and seemingly went away on its own (or went away when a typo was fixed) are off-topic as they are unlikely to help future readers." – jasonwryan, slm
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Anything show up in dmesg and/or /var/log/messages or wherever your system logs are stored? –  Mat Dec 7 '11 at 15:25
1  
what modinfo speedstep_centrino give ? that should give you some information on the module & some parameters the module can take. Also try to use insmod instead of modprobe and see if there is any error message. As far as i can see the logs aren't aware about the module. –  Hanan N. Dec 12 '11 at 21:18
1  
are you insist on using just that particular method to change the frequency ? if i could come up with something else is it OK ? –  Hanan N. Dec 12 '11 at 21:24
1  
Just load acpi_cpufreq, and check if frequency is reduced by /proc/cpuinfo –  warl0ck Aug 6 '12 at 9:44
1  
Noisy fan: Either the fan is working overtime (air flow obstructed, dirt in the machine) or its bearing is giving out. –  vonbrand Feb 8 '13 at 23:23