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I recently installed ratpoison as my first real foray into tiling window managers.

The first problem I ran into is that the Ctrl-t keybinding used for ratpoison commands conflicts with those of other software, such as the new tab command in Mozilla Firefox (which is also Ctrl-t), or activating the menu in Debian's aptitude.

In fact, it seems that even shortcuts with no apparent conflict are also affected. For instance, the Page Up/Down keys no longer scrolls, and Backspace can't bring me to the previous page in Firefox.

I saw a sample .ratpoisonrc that changes the Ctrl-t key to "less" but what key is that on the keyboard?? Also, why do some other keys stop working (i.e. like Page Up Backspace, etc.)?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

I am glad to see another ratpoison user. Let me tell you that I am a happy and satisfied ratpoison user and can not think of another window manager right now. It has increased my speed and productivity multiple times.

Now coming to your problem. The key conflicting part you can handle by pressing the key again after pressing the escape keycombination. e.g. I have my escape keybinding as Ctrl-a. Now if I want to select all the text or want to send cursor at the starting of line in bash I, have to press Ctrl-a then only a again after releasing escape keybinding.

For your other queries I need to do some reading.

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I have used ratpoison in the past. I still remember I happily remap the Caps Lock key to Ratposon's escape key. I switch to awesome because it doesn't have all funtions I need and doesn't seem to actively mantain any more.

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