Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an Xperia X8 phone, and I'd like to know if I can install a non-Android Linux OS on it? I would like to have a light Linux Distro, like Kolibri or something like that.

share|improve this question
    
I think you should probably ask on the Android Q&A site, as people there are much more likely to know about specific phones. You might enjoy reading this anyway: android-devs.com/?p=152 –  ixtmixilix Nov 16 '11 at 11:46
add comment

1 Answer

There are two ways to get a custom Linux running on an embedded device, in general:

  1. Search the web for projects describing how to port some distro to exeactly the device in question. If you find it and it looks well described, you're a happy person :) My tip here: Look at success stories first! See what actually can be done (what final functionality did people get).

  2. Advanced: use generic porting procedures, such as described here. You will need to do a research on your own, to find out what peripherals are supported, where and how to get drivers for them etc. One thing's for certain: You will need to build custom kernel for that and most often it will include getting a specific kernel version and a lot of patching. In many situations, there might be a high risk of bricking your device involved.

There is also Ångström Linux project that aims at porting Linux to different machines. Use it's online system builder to create a custom distribution - if you find that the machine is supported.

Always remember that in majority of cases at least some parts of the hardware will not be (yet) supported. Always have a close look at what's achievable before you start.


One might also take a different approach to the "Advanced" option, specifically in the case of Android-based devices: Since the given device runs a Linux-like kernel, you can use it with all the ready modules etc. But then you'll have to adapt the standard Linux userspace programs to play nicely with the not-really-linux core.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.