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First what I need to do is install a debian on a 3300mx computer which is based on a vortex cpu. The problem is the debian installer always crash because the required drivers are in the kernel as modules only. So I tried to create a custom kernel with the required drivers as native instead of modules. After a few attemps I managed to get 3 files:

  • linux-headers-3.0.0_0.2_i386.deb
  • linux-image-3.0.0_0.2_i386.deb
  • linux-libc-dev_0.2_i386.deb

I'm not even sure that I compiled these files the right way. I tried to follow some tutorials that asked me to compile my kernel with the command line :

$>fakeroot make-kpkg --append-to-version "-custom" --revision "0.1" --us --uc --initrd kernel_image kernel_headers

The problem is that when I do that, I've got the following output:

  • /usr/bin/make EXTRAVERSION=-boxls ARCH=i386 -C Documentation/lguest
  • make: * Documentation/lguest: No such file or directory. Stop.
  • make: * [debian/stamp/build/kernel] Error 2

To get the 3 .deb files I had to use a simpler command line without all the params like --append-to-version so I'm not sure they are good. Once I'll be sure my .deb files are ok I need to create a custom tftp debian installer to try it on the computers. I'm lost because I can't find out what to do with my .deb files as all the tutorials ends with a simple installation on the current system instead of the creation of a custom debian installer... Can you help me please? Thanks a lot for your help!

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migrated from serverfault.com Nov 14 '11 at 18:45

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1 Answer 1

Creating an own installer would probably be overkill in your situation. If you need it only once, then all you need is to use debootstrap from a LiveCD (that supports your system). The complete guide is presented here: http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/426 And in the comments you even see how to include your custom kernel.

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