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I need to use wget to download a file to the directory /var/cache/foobar/ (so, as an example, if I download stackexchange-site-list.txt, it'd be downloaded to /var/cache/foobar/stackexchange-site-list.txt)

Is this possible? curl would also be an option, but I'd prefer to not use curl, since it's not installed by default.

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5  
FYI, This information is available in man wget – user606723 Oct 28 '11 at 16:28
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@user606723 Can you explain why this got downvotes? It's a legitimate question. – James Oct 31 '11 at 12:29
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it's my guess that it was down voted because this is an extremely basic question and would've been solved by any sort of googling or looking in man get. The goal of stackexchange isn't to answer every possible question. – user606723 Dec 11 '11 at 22:38
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This SO Q&A explains that you can do this using the -P switch, same w/ the A below. From the manual page: How to specify the location with wget?. – slm May 7 '15 at 23:33
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This is only a basic question to those who already know the answer. To anyone who doesn’t, it is not basic. Searching the man pages is not as simple as it sounds because they are quite long and few sane people with lives have the time or wherewithal to sit and read through all of that. The best argument you can make is that the man pages could be filtered with grep or something, but even that is not likely to give the answer due to wording. – Synetech Apr 10 at 23:10
up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you know the name of the file ahead of time, you can use the -O option to wget to tell it where to write the file.

wget -O /var/cache/foobar/stackexchange-site-list.txt http://url.to/stackexchange-site-list.txt
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Thanks for your answer! – James Oct 28 '11 at 17:22
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@jrg: You can specify a download directory. See ephemient's answer. – unor Nov 27 '12 at 16:32
wget -P /var/cache/foobar/ [...]
wget --directory-prefix=/var/cache/foobar/ [...]
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1  
-P lets wget start creating sub folders depending on how you select options to download. – Kendrick Apr 28 '14 at 15:07
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-P seems to be the synonym for --directory-prefix. From the manual: ‘-P prefix’ ‘--directory-prefix=prefix’ Set directory prefix to prefix. The directory prefix is the directory where all other files and subdirectories will be saved to, i.e. the top of the retrieval tree. The default is ‘.’ (the current directory). – Engineer Dollery Feb 20 '15 at 17:29
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Thanks for actually answering the question. – jordanbtucker Feb 23 at 23:47
wget -e robots=off -r --no-parent /home/user/Desktop/MIT/ http://abc.tamu.edu/projects/tzivi/repository/revisions/2/raw/tzivi/

To add: The above code would allow you to download ALL files from the targeted directory to the directory of your choice in a single command.

Break Down of Command:

The Parameters for which wget uses to download the entire directory at once instead of one file at a time:

wget -e robots=off -r --no-parent

The Destination of Downloaded Files

/home/user/Desktop/MIT/

The Origin of Files (Online Directory)

http://abc.tamu.edu/projects/tzivi/repository/revisions/2/raw/tzivi/
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