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The Linux box I'm managing is used mainly as a web server. The owner of a site wants to give a new user access to the site so that they can do some work on it. I've created the user account (vinod) and added him to a new group called developers.

The site name is mobplay, so I need to give the developer group (or vinod) read/write access, but I'm concerned about adding or removing the current permissions in which the mobplay user and nobody group have access.

What is the best solution to ensure vinod gets access and the site continues to run as normal?

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I think your second paragraph stops mid-sentence –  Michael Mrozek Oct 4 '11 at 14:25
    
Please add some more information to your setup: Are you using apache httpd version 2.2.x? If so, what are your current "User" and "Group" settings of your httpd.conf? What Port is in use for your webserver (Listen)? –  Nils Oct 4 '11 at 21:21
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1 Answer 1

What is the best solution to ensure vinod gets access and the site continues to run as normal?

Work out how this fits within the current security model.

If it doesn't fit then redesign the security model.

But without knowing what the security model is, we can't advise you.

I can give you an example of (part of) a security model for a webserver, which easily accomodates this

  • All users requiring write access to the website are in a group, say webdev.
  • All files within the website have ownership by a member of webdev, and group ownership webdev with permission -rw-rw-r--.
  • The webserver accesses these files based on the 'other' permissions.
  • All directories within the website have the same ownership as files but with the execute bit set for all, and the group sticky bit set, i.e. drwxrwSr-x.
  • Any files to be writeable by the webserver should be -rw-rw-rw-.
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Thanks for your comment. The only thing is that as far as I know, the nobody group needs access to the public_html folder otherwise the sites will not be accessible. –  Michael Farah Oct 4 '11 at 15:00
    
As I said I don't know what your security model is - but I'd be very surprised if that is the case. –  symcbean Oct 5 '11 at 16:00
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