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Are there any solutions similar to AIX smit for Linux based OSes?

Basically this would be some kind of 'terminal menu-driver' script collection perhaps using ncurses for doing things that system administrators regurarly do.

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please take the time to read tinyurl.com/so-hints and take to heart all the advice about asking questions. I know English isn't your first language but we regularly edit your questions for things you can fix, like stop adding Thanks-In-Advance, keep the question at the top of your questions above examples, and always include information about how you have already tried to answer your own question. You might look back through how your own questions have been edited and try to emulate the corrections in your new questions. –  Caleb Jun 17 '11 at 8:06
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SuSE's YaST was text based in the beginning, similar to smitty. –  Andre Holzner Jun 17 '11 at 19:37
    
+1. The interesting part of this question is that SMIT provides command line equivalents for everything you can do with it. YaST et al do not provide a similar function. –  djs Oct 26 '12 at 0:24
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

This would be a per-distro thing. For example, Debian used to have lots of ncurses based wizards for various administration tasks particularly setting up new software. I'm not sure how much they do that any more.

However in general this does not fit the linux model of development where all the software pieces are developed independently. Any central admin interface would require constantly keeping in sync with the options being developed on all possible related software projects. In the AIX, Unix or even BSD worlds much more of the system software is developed together as part of the main distro project. this makes writing central administration systems make more sense. In the Linux world any attempt to do so is far more likely to break things than fix them. It's generally better to administer each piece of software in the way that software was designed to be used.

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