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I'm using Fedora 19. I removed my GNOME-Desktop (sudo yum remove @gnome-desktop). After that when I try to connect to internet from command line i'm facing all sorts of issues..

Ethernet cable is also connected however when i execute

$ ping www.google.com

returns

connect: Network is unreachable

When I try to execute commands like wifi-menu or netctl, i'm getting error that

$ bash: command not found

Any idea on how to resolve this...

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2 Answers 2

You've accidentally removed NetworkManager during the uninstall of GNOME Desktop.

Reinstall it with:

sudo yum install NetworkManager

and restart the Network Manager service:

sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service

Check that you are connected with:

nmcli d

which will hopefully show something similar to:

DEVICE     TYPE              STATE        
eth0       802-3-ethernet    connected

Note - the device might not be named eth0 in your setup.

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An alternative to installing NetworkManager would be to configure the interface manually. On Fedora, you'll have to look at /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-<iface_name>

Replace <iface_name> with the actual name of the interface you're trying to configure.

Edit that file to specify whether that interface will be configured via DHCP or manually. In the latter case, you'll also have to provide an IP address, a subnet mask and the IP address of the default gateway.

Assuming your interface is called eth0, the following configuration in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 should help you obtain an IP from DHCP:

DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=DHCP
ONBOOT=yes

See the Fedora docs for more information.

After the configuration file is in place, you need to issue

ifconfig eth0 up

or

ifup eth0
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