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I have a Phenom X3-8450e which has a total of 3 cores. But when i ran "sensors" on a terminal this is what i get.

user@PC ~ $ sensors

atk0110-acpi-0
Adapter: ACPI interface
Vcore Voltage: +0.99 V (min = +0.85 V, max = +1.60 V)
+3.3 Voltage: +3.38 V (min = +2.97 V, max = +3.63 V)
+5 Voltage: +5.02 V (min = +4.50 V, max = +5.50 V)
+12 Voltage: +11.98 V (min = +10.20 V, max = +13.80 V)
CPU FAN Speed: 1985 RPM (min = 600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
CHASSIS FAN Speed: 0 RPM (min = 600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
POWER FAN Speed: 0 RPM (min = 600 RPM, max = 7200 RPM)
CPU Temperature: +32.0°C (high = +60.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
MB Temperature: +27.0°C (high = +45.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)

As you can see it only displays "CPU Temperature: +32.0°C" but i would like to know the individual temperature of each core. How do i do that?
Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Use sensors-detect to configure the missing sensors, if they are available.

At my machine, there is a second sensor device handling the per-core sensors:

[...]
coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +54.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C)
Core 0:         +53.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C)
Core 1:         +53.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C)
Core 2:         +49.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C)
Core 3:         +54.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C)
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You could also use the GUI application XSensors. It will show you multiple tabs. One of them will be atk0110 as in the output you posted. One of the other tabs should display the core temperatures (may have the name coretemp).

enter image description here
Image from linuxtoolkit.blogspot.com

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That should show the same as sensors, but the problem is that coretemp is missing there. –  Volker Siegel Jul 20 at 11:57

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