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I just bought a WD 1TB Caviar Blue drive, and a Bytecc HD-35SU enclosure for it. Snapped the drive in, went to plug it in on my laptop, nothing happened. I figured that probably meant I needed to format it, so I tried to use fdisk. The new drive isn't listed. So I looked at dmesg, and I see this:

[  119.764054] usb 1-1: new high speed USB device using ehci_hcd and address 4
[  120.265826] Initializing USB Mass Storage driver...
[  120.265933] usb-storage 1-1:1.0: Quirks match for vid 152d pid 2329: 8020
[  120.265958] scsi6 : usb-storage 1-1:1.0
[  120.266153] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[  120.266156] USB Mass Storage support registered.
[  121.306221] scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access                                    PQ: 0 ANSI: 2 CCS
[  121.307330] sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0
[  121.390676] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Very big device. Trying to use READ CAPACITY(16).
[  121.391151] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] 72057594037927936 512-byte logical blocks: (0 B/0 B)
[  121.391896] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Write Protect is off
[  121.391901] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Mode Sense: 28 00 00 00
[  121.391907] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Assuming drive cache: write through
[  121.393159] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Very big device. Trying to use READ CAPACITY(16).
[  121.394280] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Assuming drive cache: write through
[  121.394290]  sdc: unknown partition table
[  121.395383] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Very big device. Trying to use READ CAPACITY(16).
[  121.396508] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Assuming drive cache: write through
[  121.396513] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Attached SCSI disk

I don't particularly know what that all means, but what concerns me is this line:

[  121.391151] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] 72057594037927936 512-byte logical blocks: (0 B/0 B)

That doesn't even make sense, right? Could it be because it is unformatted and had no partition table? However, I can't use fdisk to do any of that, because it says that it cannot read /dev/sdc...

Is my brand-new drive fried?

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What type of file system are you trying to make? –  boehj May 27 '11 at 3:13
3  
Bad enclosure? The storage driver is detecting the drive's size as 32 exabytes and/or zero bytes. Things are screwed up here at a lower level than partitions. –  John Flatness May 27 '11 at 5:56
    
Was the power on when you slapped the drive in? While SATA is hot pluggable, the USB chipset might have issues with that. Try power cycling the enclosure. –  ultrasawblade Jul 5 '11 at 18:43
    
Most likely the enclosure does not support drives that large, which require the larger 16 byte scsi commands instead of the more conventional 12 byte ones. –  psusi Aug 29 '11 at 14:03
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3 Answers

This looks like the sort of thing you get with "real" scsi and an unterminated connection - which suggests to me that those saying that it is an issue with the enclosure are probably right. As a first step, though, just check that all the cords and cables are properly plugged in.

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Either the disk's controller is broken or your kernel configuration. Try plugging it to a different computer to determine which is the case.

(Side note: 72057594037927936 512-byte logical blocks: (0 B/0 B) is a garbage, but actually partially right: if you issue echo $[ 72057594037927936 * 512 ], you'll get 0 because of integer wrap. The absurd number probably comes from some default value setting.)

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Usually it is unformatted.

fdisk /dev/sdc

n - new partition Are you able to access it?

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This is not a partitioning issue. –  Chris Down Dec 11 '11 at 8:26
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