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I installed VMware-Player-3.1.6-744570.i386 on Ubuntu 11.4. The 27.5 GB disk was about 45% full. I then used VMware-Player to form a virtual machine for Centos, using ISO files for CentOS-6.5-i386. I had done this on an old laptop, that also had Ubuntu 11.4 installed, and centos ran fine in the VM.

However, in both cases, when I installed centos VMware-Player asked me if I wanted to install an update. It was taking too long on the old laptop, which tends to overheat so I declined to do so on the laptop. However, I decided to let the update run overnight on the desktop. When I came down in the morning, the update was still running and there was only 1.5 GB left on the HD. I used the disk usage analyzer and found that most of the disk space being used was in mu home directory. However, when I went to my home directory and ran

sudo du | sort -n

the only recently update directory with heavy disk usage was the directory with centos ISOs and it was only taking up 4.8 GB.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by slm, jasonwryan, devnull, X Tian, vonbrand Mar 22 at 22:52

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to see the files based on their size, you can try the below command.

du -ah /home | grep -v "/$" | sort -h | tail -6

The above command will give the top 6 files which occupy the space. Then probably, you can decide whether those files are needed or to be deleted.

I had a similar issue where I was in need to find the files that occupy more space and more details of that question can be found here.

As per the suggestions in the answer, I would use one of the answers from this question, sorting files according to size recursively that shows you the top 10 largest files on your system.

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