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I have a private mini-dinstall based repository. sources.list.d has an entry for it, like

https://user:pass@my.host/repos/ tools/

I have installed apt-transport-https and I can happily install packages in aptitude. That's good.

But apt-cache policy does not list it. And I wonder why and how to debug this?

Update: This is on debian/stable, and as requested, here is the output for a package in the private repos:

# apt-cache policy elrond-tools
elrond-tools:
  Installed: 1.0
  Candidate: 1.0
  Version table:
     1.0 0
        500 https://my.host/repos/ tools/ Packages
 *** 1.0 0
        100 /var/lib/dpkg/status

Update 2: Okay, my confusion is increased now. I have switched the URI to http://10.*/ and suddenly it shows up. Then turned it back to the original https URL. And now that one works too.

Luckily my old stuff was still in the scrollback, and double checking it did not reveal anything new (as in: I have not missed something in the first place).

So I am confused now.

share|improve this question
    
That's odd. For the individual packages in your private repos, what does apt-cache policy pkgname show, if anything? –  Faheem Mitha Mar 8 at 16:15
    
@FaheemMitha: Updated the question to include apt-cache policy somepkg. –  Elrond Mar 8 at 16:27
    
What happens if you move it into your main sources.list? Actually, what you have listed cannot be the complete line; there is not deb or deb-src. Can you post the actual sources.list.d entry for your private repos? –  Faheem Mitha Mar 8 at 16:48
    
@FaheemMitha: Doesn't look like it is making a difference. Currently I am even unable to reproduce this. (see second update). This IS confusing me. –  Elrond Mar 8 at 18:22
    
It is odd that it is no longer reproducible. Did you you always remember to run apt-get update when adding stuff to sources? In any case you could go in to where apt stores its cache, remove the relevant files, and try again with https. Might be some https-specific bug, though it seems unlikely. –  Faheem Mitha Mar 8 at 21:21

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