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Firstly I'd like to say that I'm new to LXC and I may have some problems getting the right idea of how the things should work. The thing is I'm trying to start a previously download vagrant-lxc box that holds an Ubuntu 12.04 x32. My development PC is running Ubuntu 13.10 x64 and lxc 1.0.0.alpha1 installed from the Ubuntu official repositories. When I run vagrant up --provider=lxc I'm always getting

There was an error executing ["sudo", "lxc-create", "--template", "vagrant-tmp-lxc-test_default-1393431786", "--name", "lxc-test_default-1393431786", "-f", "/home/ccvera/.vagrant.d/boxes/lxc-ubuntu-12.04/lxc/lxc.conf", "--", "--tarball", "/home/ccvera/.vagrant.d/boxes/lxc-ubuntu-12.04/lxc/rootfs.tar.gz", "--auth-key", "/opt/vagrant/embedded/gems/gems/vagrant-1.3.5/keys/vagrant.pub"]

I might be making a dumb error here so my questions are:

1- Is there any problem running a box of x32 container inside a x64 host using LXC?

2- Is there any problem running a box with a different Ubuntu version (Kernel version) that the host machine does? In may case (Ubuntu 12.04 (kernel 2.6) vs Ubuntu 13.10 (kernel 3.11))

3- In the case that 1, 2 do not apply, then, how can I figure out what's the problem? prep-ending VAGRANT_LOG=DEBUG didn't make the trick, it just shows the above errors many times.

4- In the case that 1 or 2 do apply, then, how can I overcome the situation?, I need fast and well performance on test virtual machines, (so I think I need containers), but it is no feasible to me that the developers should have the same OS as the testing VMs

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Have you figured out anything about this use case? –  b.long Apr 7 at 12:15
1  
Yes, but I forgot to comment about it, the executing user needs to be part of sudoers, as for 1 and 2, there are not such problems, a workaround could be to erase all the contents under ~/.vagrant.d and start over if the doing the first fails. –  Carlos Castellanos Apr 7 at 14:04
    
Ah, ok. That's very helpful, thank you :) –  b.long Apr 7 at 14:18

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