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I am trying to install a wireless driver for a new laptop running ubuntu 12.04.

If I run lspci I do not see any human readable mention of a wireless card.

$ lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Haswell-ULT DRAM Controller (rev 09)
00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Haswell-ULT Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 09)
00:03.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation Device 0a0c (rev 09)
00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP USB xHCI HC (rev 04)
00:16.0 Communication controller: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP HECI #0 (rev 04)
00:19.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation Ethernet Connection I218-V (rev 04)
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP HD Audio Controller (rev 04)
00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP PCI Express Root Port 6 (rev e4)
00:1c.1 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP PCI Express Root Port 3 (rev e4)
00:1d.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP USB EHCI #1 (rev 04)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP LPC Controller (rev 04)
00:1f.2 SATA controller: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP SATA Controller 1 [AHCI mode] (rev 04)
00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation Lynx Point-LP SMBus Controller (rev 04)
02:00.0 Unassigned class [ff00]: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. Device 5227 (rev 01)
03:00.0 Network controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. Device 818b
abe-lens-laptop@abe:~$ lspci | wireless
wireless: command not found

But if I grep for "0280", which ubuntu help forums say will show me lspci output for wireless cards, I do get machine-readable output that does not mean much to me.

$ lspci -nm | grep 0280
03:00.0 "0280" "10ec" "818b" "10ec" "001b"

How can I find out what kind of wireless card I have?

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1  
you forget the grep on your lspci | wireless but still with that result will not be correct lspci -vv would maybe be more useful –  Kiwy Feb 20 at 17:33
1  
Run lspci -vnns 03:00.0 –  jasonwryan Feb 20 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

And at least, maybe lshw (you have to install it before) should give you a readable answer.

On my machine, under the section "network":

description: Wireless interface
product: PRO/Wireless 5100 AGN [Shiloh] Network Connection
vendor: Intel Corporation
physical id: 0
bus info: pci@0000:03:00.0
[...]
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If you use the -v switch with lspci you can get the name of the network card you have.

Example

$ lspci -v | grep -A 10 -i "Network Controller"
03:00.0 Network controller: Intel Corporation Centrino Wireless-N 1000 [Condor Peak]
    Subsystem: Intel Corporation Centrino Wireless-N 1000 BGN
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 45
    Memory at f2400000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=8K]
    Capabilities: <access denied>
    Kernel driver in use: iwlwifi

0d:00.0 SD Host controller: Ricoh Co Ltd MMC/SD Host Controller (rev 01)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Device 2133
    Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 16
    Memory at f2500000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256]

I have a Intel Centrino Wireless-N 1000 BGN network card in my system.

NOTE: If you want even more info about a device add additional -vv switches to lspci.

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According to Ubuntu Bug 1239578, that'd be a RTL8192EE. The latest status appears to be that there are some possibly-working beta drivers around, but no official release yet.

(I found that through two Google searches: one for realtek 818b and another for 10ec 818b. 10ec is a vendor ID for Realtek. 818b is the device ID assigned by Realtek. Searches along those lines work for pretty much any PCI/PCI-X/PCIe device.)

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