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I have amassed a small collection of *nix boxes (Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS and Puppy) and there are a couple of projects I'm considering that I need to install additional libraries. Specifically, this OpenCV stuff: http://www.samontab.com/web/2011/06/installing-opencv-2-2-in-ubuntu-11-04/

However, his instructions are for Ubuntu, using apt-get, and I want to do the same on CentOS which uses "yum". So is there some place that maps packages across package managers? I tried this on Fedora:

sudo yum install build-essential libgtk2.0-dev libjpeg62-dev libtiff4-dev libjasper-dev libopenexr-dev cmake python-dev python-numpy libtbb-dev libeigen2-dev yasm libfaac-dev libopencore-amrnb-dev libopencore-amrwb-dev libtheora-dev libvorbis-dev libxvidcore-dev

There are a few hits, but a lot of "No package xxxx available". So, I'm hoping there is a place that shows what the package names are in what package manager.

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marked as duplicate by slm, Anthon, Bernhard, terdon, manatwork Dec 31 '13 at 15:09

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This would be an epic, thankless, and incredibly worthwhile effort for somebody looking to improve Linux... –  Bandrami Dec 31 '13 at 5:07
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The tool you're looking for is called whohas: philippwesche.org/200811/whohas/intro.html. The site pkgs.org is also useful in getting a cross-section of a tool among distros: pkgs.org –  slm Dec 31 '13 at 5:51
    
@slm those are great resources and answer the question perfectly! –  terdon Dec 31 '13 at 11:07
    
@slm, thanks for the links, those look like what I need... why not post as an actual answer and not a comment? –  nomadic_squirrel Jan 3 at 3:43
    
I did on the Q that yours was linked to as a duplicate. We on SE sites we generally don't like to have repeated Q&A's , we link duplicate Q's to a single source when we can. The value is in providing many paths to a single Q&A since people think of Q's in different ways, but ultimately they're the same Q. –  slm Jan 3 at 3:58

1 Answer 1

Not that I know of. It'd be virtually impossible to track all the different packages moving across the different distributions - think of how many packages are in e.g. Debian stable right now. Not only that, but sometimes there are multiple packages for different versions or builds of one piece of software, and to top it all off (as mentioned in the comments by @Bandrami) different distributions split packages up differently - e.g. some will ship foo's themes with it, but some will put the themes in a foo-themes or foo-common package. Your best bet is using your package manager to search the online repositories.

As a side note, the problem is not mapping across different package managers, the problem is mapping across the different repositories of the different distributions. For example, Ubuntu and Debian both use DPKG and APT. But they both have different online repositories and installing a package from one repository onto the other system is likely to cause breakage.

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Not to mention the fact that different repositories slice up packages differently (eg, some ship Windowmaker's themes with it, others slice those off into a -data or -common or -themes package). –  Bandrami Dec 31 '13 at 5:15

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