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I am a linux newbie and I have a very basic question. I have three machines in production -

machineA    10.66.136.129
machineB    10.66.138.181
machineC    10.66.138.183

and all those machines have Ubuntu 12.04 installed in it and I have root access to all those three machines.

Now I am supposed to do below things in my above machines -

Create mount point /opt/exhibitor/conf
Mount the directory in all servers.
 sudo mount <NFS-SERVER>:/opt/exhibitor/conf /opt/exhibitor/conf/

I have already created /opt/exhibitor/conf directory in all those three machines as mentioned above.

Now I am trying to create a Mount Point. So I followed the below process -

Install NFS support files and NFS kernel server in all the above three machines

$ sudo apt-get install nfs-common nfs-kernel-server

Create the shared directory in all the above three machines

$ mkdir /opt/exhibitor/conf/

Edited the /etc/exports and added the entry like this in all the above three machines -

# /etc/exports: the access control list for filesystems which may be exported
#               to NFS clients.  See exports(5).
#
# Example for NFSv2 and NFSv3:
# /srv/homes       hostname1(rw,sync,no_subtree_check) hostname2(ro,sync,no_subtree_check)
#
# Example for NFSv4:
# /srv/nfs4        gss/krb5i(rw,sync,fsid=0,crossmnt,no_subtree_check)
# /srv/nfs4/homes  gss/krb5i(rw,sync,no_subtree_check)
#
/opt/exhibitor/conf/     10.66.136.129(rw)
/opt/exhibitor/conf/     10.66.138.181(rw)
/opt/exhibitor/conf/     10.66.138.183(rw)

I have tried mounting on machineA like below from machineB and machineC and it gives me this error-

root@machineB:/# sudo mount -t nfs 10.66.136.129:/opt/exhibitor/conf /opt/exhibitor/conf/
mount.nfs: access denied by server while mounting 10.66.136.129:/opt/exhibitor/conf

root@machineC:/# sudo mount -t nfs 10.66.136.129:/opt/exhibitor/conf /opt/exhibitor/conf/
mount.nfs: access denied by server while mounting 10.66.136.129:/opt/exhibitor/conf

Did my /etc/exports file looks good? I am pretty sure, I have messed up my exports file. As I have the same content in all the three machines in exports file.

Any idea what wrong I am doing here? And what will be the correct /exports file here?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

exportfs

When you create a /etc/exports file on a server you need to make sure that you export it. Typically you'll want to run this command:

$ exportfs -a

This will export all the entries in the exports file.

showmount

The other thing I'll often do is from other machines I'll check any machine that's exporting NFS shares to the network using the showmount command.

$ showmount -e <NFS server name>

Example

Say for example I'm logged into scully.

$ showmount -e mulder
Export list for mulder:
/export/raid1/isos     192.168.1.0/24
/export/raid1/proj     192.168.1.0/24
/export/raid1/data     192.168.1.0/24
/export/raid1/home     192.168.1.0/24
/export/raid1/packages 192.168.1.0/24

fstab

To mount these upon boots you'd add this line to your client machines that want to consume the NFS mounts.

server:/shared/dir /opt/mounted/dir nfs rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr

automounting

If you're going to be rebooting these servers then I highly suggest you look into setting up automounting (autofs) instead of adding these entries to /etc/fstab. It's a bit more work but is well worth the effort.

Doing so will allow you to reboot the servers more independently from one another and also will only create the NFS mount when it's actually needed and/or being used. When it goes idle it will get unmounted.

References

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Thanks for suggestion. I just did that and now it works fine. Instead of running exportfs -a, I ran exportfs -rv. Is there any difference in between those? And in my case, showmount -e 10.66.136.129 I will be doing from machineB and machineC. right? –  Webby Dec 21 '13 at 8:05
    
@TechGeeky - not really. exportfs -rv just does a reexport + is verbose. The -a will export everything. As to showmount -e yes you can run it from those machines or the one serving the shares. –  slm Dec 21 '13 at 8:08
    
ok.. Thanks, makese sense now.. One last thing. I believe there is one more thing to this mount point thing, fstab file.. correct? Now which machine fstab file, I am supposed to modify? And what content I am supposed to add in there? Any idea? –  Webby Dec 21 '13 at 8:13
    
@TechGeeky see updates. You add entries to the clients that want to consume the NFS shares. –  slm Dec 21 '13 at 8:15
    
+1, this answers the original problem that the OP had, my answer only appeared to be correct because of misleading wording in the question. –  Chris Down Dec 21 '13 at 9:02

I saw the same error (mount.nfs: access denied by server while mounting...) and the issue was fixed by -o v3 option as follows:

$ sudo mount -o v3 a-nfs-server:/path/to/export /path/to/mount
  • Server is Ubuntu 14.04 64bit LTS.
  • Client is CentOS 6.5 64bit.
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/etc/exports needs to be edited on the NFS server machine, not the clients, as you state you did, as it is checked by the NFS server when a client requests access to a share.

If you put the following in /etc/exports on the NFS server, it should work:

/opt/exhibitor/conf 10.66.136.129(rw)
/opt/exhibitor/conf 10.66.138.181(rw)
/opt/exhibitor/conf 10.66.138.183(rw)
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I already have this in my exports file on machineA. And then I am mounting it from machineB and machineC and it doesn't work somehow.. Is it possible I have added same information in all the three machines in exports file, will that be a problem? I should be adding only in machineA? –  Webby Dec 21 '13 at 7:56
1  
@TechGeeky Did you reload the NFS exports after doing that, using exportfs -a? –  Chris Down Dec 21 '13 at 7:58
    
I just did that and now it works fine. I am trying to understand this whole thing in better way, so my first question is, machineA is NFS server and machineB and machineC are clients.. Correct? Second question is, if machineA is my NFS server, then only in the /etc/exports file of machineA, I will be adding the above three lines as you mentioned in your solution and we won't touch exports file of machineB and machineC? Correct? –  Webby Dec 21 '13 at 8:04
    
@TechGeeky As long as you are mounting a share on machine A, then that's correct in both cases. –  Chris Down Dec 21 '13 at 8:04
    
Thanks. Now I understand this much better. Why I have asked this question because I also have similar stuff in staging environment. And what I did in those three machines in staging environment, I added same three lines in all my /etc/exports files of three machines instead of adding it only in machineA but still it works fine. And now I have understood the whole concept more clearly. Thanks for the help. –  Webby Dec 21 '13 at 8:08

In my case works using nfs4 doing:

$ sudo mount -t nfs4 server-name:/ /path/to/mount

In the /etc/export file on server

/Path/to/export 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,fsid=0,no_root_squash,crossmnt,no_subtree_check,no_acl)

fsid=0 makes the /Path/to/export the root directory when you mount the share.

crossmnt, because I have some others drives in the exported file system that I want to access also.

no_root_squash, because I want to access as root user (su) from the client side. I'm pretty sure that I'm the only one that can do that in my local network.

Server and clients are Ubuntu 14.04 64bit.

If you want to use nfs3, the answer of @fumisky-wells works for me as well.

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