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As we all know, the intervention of root is necessary to mount a filesystem on Linux. But is it possible to do this without access to the root account? Because I don't know the password of root.

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What linux distro are you on? Does the sudo command exist? –  Random832 Nov 25 '13 at 16:30
    
@ Random - Fedora,and sudo command is exist.But I don't want to use root access to do this.Any way can do that but root? –  binghenzq Nov 26 '13 at 0:35

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Your question is something of an oxymoron - you start by stating that root is required to mount filesystems then ask how filesystems can be mounted without root access.

Yes, it's completely possible - and because this is a Unix type system there's lots of different ways to do it. You could use sudo to allow the user to run a specific script as root which will mount the filesystem, or use pam_mount, or add the filesystem to the fstab with appropriate options to mount as a non-root user with the user option, or to mount the filesystem automaticaly on boot (as root) with the auto option

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@ symcbean - Your answer seems also need root competence to config Unix type system. But now I have only a ordinary user account,so I can't config Unix system. What can I do?By the way, Unix system is server here. –  binghenzq Nov 25 '13 at 13:04
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@binghenzq: they don't require the root password at the time of mounting. If you don't have root acces on the machine it's still possible to access an SMB filesystem (using smbclient) but it's not possible to mount any filesystem. If nobody knows the root password then your system is highly vulnerable and this MUST be resolved. –  symcbean Nov 25 '13 at 13:53
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@ symcbean - SMB is a good idea,I just want to share files between windows and Unix.I will have a try,thanks. –  binghenzq Nov 25 '13 at 14:09
    
SMB/CIFS is definitely the way to go for that (or if you're able to get onto the windows machine, something like winsshfs or winscp if ssh is available on the linux server) –  Rob Nov 25 '13 at 15:50
    
@symcbean It's possible that he has a linux distribution that doesn't allow direct login with root but requires sudo. –  Random832 Nov 25 '13 at 16:30

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